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Nebullam: The Indoor Farm Using Technology to Replace the Produce Aisle
  1.  >Nebullam: The Indoor Farm Using Technology to Replace the Produce Aisle

Clayton Mooney, the founder of Nebullam, was always good at numbers. At one point, in fact, he wanted to become a professional poker player, but rather than go on gut feelings, he treated it like a business, using mathematical odds to play the game. He would play up to 40 tables at once, which is about 80 hands per table, per hour, or about 3000 hands every hour. So when Clayton founded his company, he never intended to become a farmer. Instead, the plan was to reinvent the way indoor farming is done, which, as it turns out, is antiquated, inefficient, and produces small amounts of food per square foot while requiring a lot of labor. That’s why most indoor farms go bust, Their plan was to create and sell mobile, modern equipment which makes indoor farming far more efficient, then license the software that runs it for recurring income. Clayton would use data, and his mastery of mathematics, to make it all work. They needed to test their concept, so they temporarily sold the beautiful produce they grew to local restaurants and grocery stores to offset the cost of running the business. Nebullam grew at 2% to 5% month over month, proving the idea was a strong one. Then, out of nowhere, the pandemic hits, costing them at least ¾ of their income. They pivoted. They decided to try a subscription model, selling produce direct to customers on a subscription basis, delivering it straight to the doorstep. It worked. This is a fascinating story about data, ingenuity, courage, determination, and the freshest produce you’ve likely ever had.

Clayton Mooney, the founder of Nebullam, was always good at numbers. At one point, i...

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